Values that Impact Hispanic Perspectives

It is difficult to discuss cultural trends within the Hispanic community without generalizing or stereotyping. This has been a continuous struggle for educators, employers, and organizations. How can we educate children or adults about cultural issues without reinforcing stereotypes? Any diversity training about a specific cultural group must also include disclaimers about the differences within each culture.

When implementing programs and engaging Hispanic families and individual in formal volunteering these VALUES, written below in Spanish, need to be considered:

Familismo –     a strong identification and attachment to the family that is marked by strong feelings of loyalty, reciprocity and solidarity among family members (Shartarand, 1996). Family members provide support and are often involved in the decision-making process. Many decisions in the home are made by the entire family. Latinos are family and community oriented. Family or group need take precedence over the needs of the individual.

Education –     teaching children important lessons, including the difference between rights, wrong, respect for parents and elders, and good manners. The importance of morality, respect, and family unity, as well as high expectations and aspirations for children’s academic and occupational success are integrated in this concept (Shartrand, 1996).

Respeto –        personal respect and influence. This value is very important in
interpersonal relations in that it allows individuals to feel that their
personal power or influence is being acknowledged by others (Marin and Marin, 1991).

Simpatia –       conformity and empathy for the feelings of others. This value compels people to behave with dignity and respect toward others and to strive to achieve harmony in interpersonal relations while avoiding interpersonal conflict (Marin and Marin, 1991)

Collectivism – emphasis is placed on the needs, objectives, attitudes and values of a group. Interpersonal relationships in the group, that are nurturing, loving, intimate, and respectful are preferred (Marin and Marin, 1991).

Concept of time- Hispanic tend to be more present time oriented. Finishing a conversation now may be more importance than keeping an appointment later. Often Latinos are late for appointment or meeting and it is because of their time concept. Eagerness is not looked at as being appropriate.

Communication- Hispanic/Latinos tend to have an indirect communication style. It is more formal than that of Anglos.  In it respect is highly valued and shown by using formal titles and by being very polite.

Trust/Loyalty- Trust is one of the most important aspects of building any relationship. Developing trust and personal relationship with Latino families is a wise first step. Trust is earned over an extended period of time because of the high value placed on it in Latino culture. When you start a new relationship or service it is important to keep track of commitments and obligations and to be sure to fulfill them.  If you lose trust, you may have to start rebuilding trust from the beginning.  It is impossible to build relationship overnight, but you can definitely lose them quickly.

                                                                                                by Bernice Rivera


                                                           TIPS FOR COMMUNICATION WITH LATINOS
                                                                                                       Bernice Rivera

When Speaking:
  • Speak clearly
  • Spell your name and title slowly and clearly.
  • Take the time to introduce yourself and have the other person introduce themselves.
  •  After you have spent a few minutes talking informally with the person, you can then explain why you have come to talk with them.  
  • State the purpose of your call early in the conversation.
  • Use short sentences and generally cover only one idea per sentence.
  • Avoid “or” questions  and negative questions
  • Do not use slang or jargon as many non-native English speakers will not understand the reference
  • Avoid using humor or jokes as many things do not translate well
Confirm numbers carefully $13.50 “ one-three-five-zero”

 Special phone numbers 5  0 3  - 9 7 7 – 6 8 0 0

  • Clarify spelling to avoid misunderstanding
       “t” like Tokyo “ p” Paris “    ‘ a’  Apple  ‘r “  River
  • If there is a need for a follow-up conversation be prepared to suggest a date, time and telephone number where you can be reached.
  • Conclude the conversation by summarizing your understanding of any decisions made and any action steps required by either party.
  • Restate what the person has said and ask if you have understood them correctly
  • Politely repeat key words and key points. Give a summary every so often of what you have said to make sure you understand each other
 
When using Written Communication:
  • Begin communication with a greeting or an expression of appreciation for the most recent communication received.
  • Use the 3-sentence rule as it is sometimes called.  This means taking the time to write a nice introductory paragraph. If you show interest in the actual person, their life and/or interests it is seen as a sign of respect and your message will be much better received.
  • After you have made your introductory paragraph or welcome statement then you can introduce your question, objective or purpose for the contact.
  • State the purpose of your letter or email early.
  • Use short sentences and generally cover only one idea per sentence.
  • Do not use slang or jargon unless you are absolutely sure they will be understood.
  • Be careful in using humor or jokes as many things do not translate well
  • If there is a need for a follow-up conversation be prepared to suggest a date, time and telephone number where you can be reached.
  • Conclude the conversation by summarizing your understanding of any decisions made any action steps required by either party
Other Tips:

Use language that resonates with Latinos
      Don’t ask them to volunteer, ask them to help out –something they do all of the time

Make Personal contact
      Talk to people face to face

Go where they go
      Attend festivals and events so they have a chance to get to know you.

Include male family members
      Many decisions in the home are made by the entire family

Make it social
You could include food that is familiar to them sharing food is a way Latinos show    they care.

Develop a trusting and personal relationship with Latino families

 


Comments

04/09/2017 8:15am

It's true that Hispanic culture and tradition are full of learning to absorb. I must know it, because I grew up with a Spanish nanny. The differences between her traits to us are really noticeable. But to give her the credits, I've learned a lot of good things from her. She taught me how to pray. More than that, I developed a deep faith. There are numerous things she introduced to me but having a deep faith is the best thing she taught me!

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